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Large ‘potentially dangerous’ asteroid passes Earth on Tuesday

Astronomers are tracking a large and "potentially dangerous" asteroid set to make a relatively close past Earth on Tuesday.

The asteroid, called 7482 (1994 PC1), is expected to fly past our planet around 4:51 p.m., about five times the distance from Earth to the Moon.

"Near-Earth #asteroid 1994 PC1 (~ 1 km wide) is very well known and has been studied for decades by our #Planetary Defense experts, "NASA tweeted last Wednesday. "Rest assured, 1994 PC1 will surely fly past our planet 1.2 million miles away next Tuesday, January 18th."

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With a diameter of about 3,451 feet, the 1994 PC1 is larger than the Burj Khalifa in Dubai and more than twice the size of the Empire State Building in New York City.

It is also fast and will run at a speed of about 45,000 mph when it passes Earth on Tuesday, according to NASA.

A mosaic image of the asteroid Bennu, composed of 12 PolyCam images collected on December 2, 2018 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles (24 km).  NASA / Goddard / University of Arizona / Handout via REUTERS

A mosaic image of the asteroid Bennu, composed of 12 PolyCam images collected on December 2, 2018 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles (24 km). NASA / Goddard / University of Arizona / Handout via REUTERS (Reuters)

Although it will not hit Earth, NASA 1994 considers PC1 a "potentially dangerous object" because of its size and distance from our planet.

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If you want to check out space rock, it's currently being tracked by NASA's "eyes on asteroid" website. You can also watch it on the Virtual Telescope Projects livestream, which is set to start at. 15:00 ET.

1994 PC1 was discovered in 1994 at the Siding Spring Observatory in Australia by astronomer Robert McNaught.

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After the pass on Tuesday, the asteroid will not come so close to Earth for another two centuries, according to Universe Today, a news site for space and astronomy.

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